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  • 5 Things I Learned About Myself And Attachment

     
    Lessons from Dr. Thompson's Attachment: Shame and the Embodiment of Beauty workshop.
    By Pam Stroup

    On September 16, I attended an LCI workshop entitled Attachment: Shame and the Embodiment of Beauty, featuring local psychiatrist and author, Dr. Curt Thompson. In his book, Anatomy of the Soul, Dr. Thompson writes of attachment, “in order to fully engage our relationship with God, it is most helpful to be fully aware of the patterns by which we have attached to our primary caregivers. The ways we have connected have important correlations with the structure and function of our brains.”  I wasn’t sure what to expect from the workshop, but he had me spellbound much of the time.  I was intrigued and a bit overwhelmed with the content, inspired by the application of the material to the Bible and the Story of God, and touched by his own vulnerability.  Also, my own emotions were engaged.
    Five things I learned…

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  • Why It’s Possible To Have Healthy Attachment Styles

    Understanding the attachment process can help you have a more peaceful life.
    by Cindy Hunter

    Last week we made our annual sojourn to the beach.  As is typical, we planned our vacation to coincide with our good friends.  That put one of our daughters a block away from her lifelong best friend. Perfect proximity by my way of thinking.

    My long ago Outer Banks trips with my childhood bestie “June Bug” conjured up mystical memories of surf, sand, and the joy of joining another family, albeit for just a week.  The fact that these trips only happened for me between the ages of 10 and 15, forty plus years ago, has done nothing to dim their luminosity in my memory.

    And so it goes, periodically, that I must entice my mountain-loving husband and kids back to the place where life was at its best for me as a child.  For many years, I did…

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  • There is No Fix-All Marriage Manual

    manual on marriage

    by Dr. Bill Clark 

    Recently, I sat with two friends at Starbucks discussing ministry, marriages, marriage dilemmas, the things we tend to say and think about marriage. As we talked I felt the familiar feeling; “Why is this so hard? So confusing?”

    The three of us have good marriages but we freely admit how we fail to love well, how we take our wives for granted, how we exhaust them. We still enjoy marriage and care, deeply. But even we find ourselves wondering, “What do I do now?” We all seem to want a guidebook, a manual, something clear and compelling that we can all subscribe to; something that tells us, “What do I do when ____ is happening?”
    We all seem to want a guidebook, a manual, something clear and compelling that we can all subscribe to.
    One of the men, involved in a marriage ministry, described 3 marriages which ended in divorce…

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  • Helping to Carry the Load: Caring for Others

    bike

    When I think about caring for others, I am reminded of a the time I joined some fellow cyclists on the Civil War Century bike ride. I signed up for the 64-mile ride which was further than I had ever ridden before. For much of the ride, I was doing fine and pedaling along with the others.

    Well I was doing fine until about the last 10 miles. My legs were worn out, and I wasn’t able to keep up with the others. My husband, Ken, saw that I was struggling and dropped back from the rest of the riding crew. He slowed his pace to match my pace and he rode alongside me talking to me and encouraging me along the way.

    As we hit one of the last hills, I was certain that I would not be able to climb it. It was then that Ken reached out and placed…

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Alexandria, VA

"The training and ongoing supervision that our lay counselors have received from LCI has been invaluable in shepherding our congregation. While we respect the role that professional counselors play in personal Christian growth, and refer our members to professionals when appropriate, one of our bedrock philosophies at APC is the belief that God equips and gifts the local congregation to minister to one another in significant ways.

Counseling is an important ministry in every church. God has used our lay counselors to help bring about real change in the lives of members in our congregation. It has been deeply encouraging to not only witness true change in the lives of our members, but also to observe the impact in the lives of our lay counselors, as they witness the Holy Spirit using them in the lives of others in ways they could not have imagined. I am a firm and enthusiastic supporter of lay counseling ministry and am thankful that the Lord has placed this rich resource, LCI’s lay counselor training in our backyard. The shepherding ministry at APC is healthier and richer because of it."

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